Tag Archives: Laurel Trainor

Music, synchronization, and teamwork

My husband and I happened to be in Minneapolis a month ago just as the Minnesota Orchestra was beginning its 2019-2020 season, and we went to the opening concert.   The concert, with music by Rautavaara, Grieg, Carter, and Elgar, opened with The Star-Spangled Banner, and all 1800 people in the audience immediately rose to their feet and began singing.  Minnesota has a strong choral tradition, everyone sang at full voice, and the sound of those 1800 voices nearly lifted  me off my feet.  It was an emotional experience, and even though I didn’t know anyone there, the singing together of the national anthem made me feel part of a larger community.  And, in fact, studies show that people who make music together are more likely to cooperate and feel more connected as a group.

The business world has long been aware of  “connectedness through music” and has used string quartets as examples of “self-management teams.”  Many string quartets supplement their musical performance schedules with presentations to companies and organizations exploring teamwork, problem solving, reliability, trust, discipline, and flexibility within the quartet as an example of how an excellent small team works.  You hear the result of that group “connectedness” in the music as they perform.  Success depends on an extraordinary level of teamwork. Continue reading

New year – new musical beginnings

Credit: © Noam/Fotolia.com

Credit: © Noam/Fotolia.com

What better way to begin the new year than by talking about new lives and musical beginnings!  Babies and music are a source of endless fascination – and the subject of a lot of research.  We know that babies like to be sung to (think lullabies), they like bouncing or waving their arms when they hear music, they like toys that make musical sounds, and if musical toys aren’t available, they find their own musical instruments.

Newborns have a wide range of musical abilities, some of which I’ve written about in  Are we hardwired for music?    Now a recent study by Laurel Trainor and colleagues at McMaster University in Canada shows that babies benefit from musical training even before they can walk or talk.  One-year old babies who had participated with their parents in interactive music classes communicated better, showed more sophisticated brain responses to music, and even smiled more.   Continue reading